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No child should struggle in life

NOAH Mwewa with one of the beneficiaries.

ZIO MWALE, Lusaka
HE described his childhood as tough. He says he struggled to get most of the things that he desired.Now aged 29, Noah Mwewa is founder of Posterity Zambia, a non-governmental platform structured to provide material and monetary support to vulnerable Zambian children who are struggling or are not in school because of lack of money.
“Looking back at my childhood, I struggled to get almost anything, life taught me lessons and for that reason, I cannot stand to see an innocent child struggle,” Mwewa, who is also author of the book Human Responsibilities, about helping children, says.
“I was born in a family of six and our daily struggle ranged from insufficient food to water, we got water from a shallow well and I remember clearly when my mother would tell us that the house had no food and promised to look for something to eat the following morning,” he says. “At some point, sleeping on an empty stomach was [considered] normal.”
Since its creation in 2016, Posterity Zambia has attracted about 50 members who have dedicated themselves to supporting children with finances for their education and other necessities like clothes.
Mr Mwewa says that all members of Posterity Zambia pledge an amount of money every month that is directed towards the support for the children.
The platform also sends messages of help on social media platforms whenever it has a deficiency.
“Platforms like Facebook and WhatsApp have really helped us to organise money from people that are willing to help, we are hoping to work with organisations that can support us,” he says. “From the money we raise, we identify a child who truly needs help.”
The platform also provides mentorship and monitoring of the school performance of its beneficiaries to strengthen their academic commitment.
“This year we are targeting 1,000 vulnerable children, we want to fight illiteracy in Zambian children because I believe every child regardless of the background has got something good to offer when educated,” he shared.
He says his commitment to promoting education among the underprivileged children can be traced back to his childhood where he was born and raised in a poverty stricken home in Ipusukilo Township in Kitwe.
Mr Mwewa describes his upbringing as “a tough childhood”. And he is right.
“My father worked as a garden boy but he did other private jobs to manage our family, while my mother was a housewife, it was tough for me to get educated because all family members had to survive through my father’s little pay,” he explained.
Fortunately for him, he was able to overcome all that and graduate from the Evelyn Hone College in Lusaka with a diploma in Production Management.
Later, he worked for an Austrian company that sponsored him to do a certificate in Mining Safety at Orica Mining Resource in South Africa.
“While at Evelyn Hone, the Ministry of Education offered me a 100 percent bursary that helped me through to my graduation,” he says.
Before attending Evelyn Hone, he went to Mitanto Secondary School in Kitwe. He completed his secondary school in 2008.
Currently, Mr Mwewa is working as a Health and Safety supervisor for Cooperativa Muratori Cemensti (CMC), an international construction company, contracted by the Millennium Challenge Corporation to construct the famous Bombay drainage system in Lusaka.
That he is able to dedicate part of his time and money to see a vulnerable child get educated, is a dream come true for him.
“I didn’t know that I will be here today helping others but life is not a competition but an opportunity to manifest what God uniquely deposited in us, there is always a dateline to blaming others for not bettering ourselves,” he says.
Mr Mwewa has also been drawn to writing. After his first book, Human Responsibilities, he followed it up with another one titled Dream.
“Just like my first book, the new book shares ideas how we can make our society a better place for everyone regardless of age,” he says.
Going forward, Posterity Zambia hopes to create an investment fund.


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