Entertainment

Best of Ba Crazy coming

BA CRAZY.

THELMA BWALYA, Lusaka
AFTER about 13 years of being largely inactive on the local music front, Ba Crazy are back in the studio working on a new album which they have titled “Best of Ba Crazy”.Joe, who together with Andrew and Darlington make up Ba Crazy, says they have been quiet because they have had personal things to do.
He says Darlington and Andrew went to school while he continued singing as Joe Crazy while also doing school.
Joe says they have decided to come back together because they love music and they have missed singing.
“We were off as a group, you know how it is when you start growing everyone has something that they want to do apart from music,” he says. “We’ve decided to come back because we’ve missed what we love doing, we love music and that’s what even brought us together before so we thought let’s come back and try and do what we love doing.”
Joe says the new album is scheduled to be released mid next year but they have already started recording songs with two already done.
They are working with different producers like Jerry Fingers, Emmanuel, Big Banger, Ben Blazer, TK and Mzenga Man. They are also looking to work with Petersen and CQ as well as some new artistes on the block.
“We want to fuse in even the new generation because music has changed so we need to have different types of music, our touch and the new touch,” he says.
“From 2005 to now, there’s been different types of music, so we’re trying to fuse in the old and new music. So we’ll call our music Afri-soul because we do African music, this time people fuse in English and vernacular, so we’ll and do that just to give a variety to everyone.”
Joe says they will release a single this year which should come out together with a video because people might have forgotten what they look like physically.
“Our fans should expect good music as usual, educative music and the realness. We’re trying to keep it more African, we don’t want to run away from Zambian music because that’s how people should recognise us,” he says. “When they just listen to the music, they should be able to say these are Zambians, they’re Africans, and so we’d like to maintain that.”

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