Features

Tribal cousin Lungu on course

SAMUEL NGOMA, Brazil
SCARCELY is tribal cousinship found in other countries. Scarcely is it known. Scarcely is it practiced in intra-national relationships. Scarcely, except in Zambia and a semblance of it down-under between Aussies and Kiwis.
In the broad sweep of things, tribal cousinship has been Zambia’s national unity glue since records began. It is ‘breathed and lived’ at our markets, in the workplace, in school, on public transport, radio and television, everywhere. There is so much to unpack in tribal cousinship. It is who we are as Zambians. Ask anyone, Zambians have always coalesced around tribal cousinship under the banner of national unity. Like poetry in motion, there are so many compelling narratives of tribal cousinship as Zambia’s unifier-in-chief.
That is why, any sensible Zambian in the diaspora, was perturbed recently to see President Edgar Lungu come under heavy attack in some quarters for merely practicing cousinship with Bembas. The whiplash against the Head of State was totally unZambian and unfounded all because of the crisis actors of our politics. They deliberately mischaracterised his pun. President Lungu does not need a second invitation to throw banter at his tribal cousins. Tribal cousinship is President Lungu’s existential right as an Easterner whose late mother, Ama Jere, was Ngoni royalty by name. http://epaper.daily-mail.co.zm/

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