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Mental illness gives rise to suicide

MWAPE MWENYA, Lusaka
THE phone slowly slips off Dorothy Kabwe’s hand and falls as she slumps into the chair with a deep sense of shock.
Her maid quickly picks up the phone from the floor and hands it back to her, but she refuses to get it back.
The distress call was from Ms Kabwe’s mother, who had just informed her about the death of her nephew, who killed himself by consuming a poisonous substance.
The boy was 14 years old and Ms Kabwe took him in after the death of her older sister. She could not come to terms with her nephew’s death because not too long ago, the family had been grieving the loss of another relative who also took his life.
Before long, Ms Kabwe started experiencing illusions and at some point, her mother found some capsules in her bedroom which the family suspected she wanted to kill herself with.
Three years down the line, Ms Kabwe opens up about how depression weighed her down and almost took her to an early grave after losing her nephew.
“My sister died mysteriously when she came back from a drinking spree in the morning. We found her gasping for air with blood oozing from both nostrils. We suspect that someone could have put poison in her beer. The family was devastated because she was the first-born and my mother had so much hope in her,” Ms Kabwe said.
The death of the boy and another relative who had taken his life earlier, brought fear in the family because of a common misconception that CLICK TO READ MORE




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