Business

Lunsemfwa hydro keen to increase power in Mkushi

TRYNESS MBALE, Lusaka
ALMOST US$7 million has been set aside for the proposed construction of a 132 kilovolts (Kv) power line by Lunsemfwa Hydro Power Company (LHPC) and Mkushi Copper Joint Venture to cover the power deficit in Mkushi.
The project will supply power to the Mkushi Copper Joint Venture mine with the spill-over effects in form of supply to health centres and schools along the transmission line.
Lunsemfwa Hydro Power Company has also partnered with Zesco Limited to implement the project after the construction of the transmission line. the latter will be responsible for commissioning and running it.
This is contained in an environmental impact statement (EIS) report submitted by LHPC to the Zambia Environmental Management Agency (ZEMA) and obtained by the Daily Mail.
The 72-kilometre line will be constructed for 132Kv but charged at 66Kv .
“Lunsemfwa Hydro Power Company and Mkushi Copper Joint Venture propose to construct a transmission line from Lunsemfwa hydro-power station to the Mkushi Copper Joint Venture.
“The main product line will be the supply of electricity to Chikupili chiefdom, parts of Mukonchi area and Mkushi farm block to cover the power deficit .The project will cost US$6.84 million with anticipated change resulting from reviews,” the report reads.
The implementation of the project will involve the construction of two substations 132-66/33Kv in Chimsoro Farms and Mkushi Mine respectively.
It says the transmission line will be constructed on a 30 metre way-leave that will traverse the Chikupili and Mukonchi chiefdom crossing Lunsemfwa River, streams, forests and several active agricultural fields.
On the socio-economic effects, the construction of the transmission line is anticipated to provide jobs for skilled and unskilled labour in the area, and opportunities for contractors to provide services in construction and supply of goods.
Other benefits are that the line will provide additional power to Mkushi farm block.
The project will, however, negatively affect the quality of surface water, air, noise and animal life although mitigation measures have been put in place.

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