Columnists

Importance of heroes in society

SHIKANDA Kawanga.

Analysis: SHIKANDA KAWANGA
IT IS a known fact that for every wealthy and learned person, there is some form of inspiration either from a person or maybe even a circumstance.
This is why in real life, heroes are important, whether they are entertainers, sports people, politicians or public figures.
Heroes serve a purpose in society. They help give people hope, and provide examples for success. Most heroes are comfortable with sharing the story of their success with others and those are the ones needed in society.
Whilst in everyone’s life, the most important heroes are the family members. Other important ones are mentors who help in developing skills and abilities.
This shows that heroes can come from anywhere.
Even though titles are not needed to be a hero, often those that possess formal authority are, by default, heroes to others. As a manager, it’s important to understand that you are a hero to junior employees because of the title.
Therefore the need to have women or youths in decision making positions in any institution can help these marginalised group to work hard and aspire for the top jobs.
In most organisations, women and youths have few role models to look up to. This is why youths and women lose faith because they do not see people like themselves advancing to leadership positions.
This is why managers have a great responsibility to live up to their role by acting with integrity. As a manager, a formal title comes with an expectation that one will act ethically and in accordance with what the organisation cares about.
This act helps the junior officers to get inspired.
But that is not all as research on heroes also reveals several non-obvious ways that heroes improve other people’s lives.
There are various psychological benefits that heroes provide such as elevation. When people experience elevation, they feel a mix of awe, reverence, and admiration for a morally beautiful act.
Heroes heal psychic wounds. Hero stories calm people’s fears, buoy their spirits, nourishe hopes, and foster important values of strength and resilience.
Heroes nourish connections with other people. For instance a long time ago, the act of gathering around communal fires to hear stories, established social connections with others. This sense of family, group, or community remains, central to human emotional well-being which is cardinal to professional growth. This is because heroes are role models who reinforce the most treasured values and connections with others.
Heroes show us how to transform our lives. In every hero story, the hero starts out missing an important quality, usually self-confidence, humility, or a sense of his or her true purpose in life. To succeed, the hero must recover, or discover, this quality. Every hero story tells of a journey towards vast personal transformation.
A push for more women and youths at the helm can have a trickledown effect that inspires others to aspire to the executive level. But to do this, organisations should include the unique assets that women and youths can bring to the table.
Of course one would say youths are never serious with work or maybe women cannot handle certain roles, truth be told, youths and women have unique strengths in areas that are critical to advancing institutions.
Even though men may have these attributes as well, it is to an organisation’s greatest advantage to place employees in positions where their strengths will be harnessed. Company management should place value on individual women’s unique strengths and abilities and work to develop them across leadership roles.
Women and youths are a critical part of the workforce and when women and youths do well, organisations do well.
Providing training in specialised skills and recognising the power women bring to your organisation will help you advance in a competitive landscape. It does not just benefit your company and its stakeholders—it benefits the world we live in, too.
People need heroes to save or improve lives through inspiration. But we also need heroes for surprising reasons that go beyond the direct benefits of heroic action. Heroes elevate people emotionally; they heal psychological ills, they build connections between people; they encourage people to transform for the better and they help others to become heroes.
Overall, good heroes use the power of transformation not only to change themselves for the better, but also to transform the world. In the classic hero journey, the newly transformed hero eventually transforms society in significant and positive ways.
Good hero stories comfort people and give them hope to soldier on in their quest for particular goals.
The author is a photojournalist and writer.

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