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Floyd vs Conor a death wish just for $000,000s

MWASHINGWELE

Analysis: AUGUSTINE MWASHINGWELE
SURE, they keep starting him and will not just let him be. It seems prey cannot just get enough of being devoured and will still navigate its way into

the lethal jaws of an unwilling, overfed predator. Even the predator’s initiative to put up repeated gestures to evince his absolute lack of appetite for the sumptuous meal flooding itself before his unforgiving mouth is never enough to remind the prey of the golden maxim “you only live once on earth”.
Days are fast pacing towards August 26, when living ring legend Floyd Mayweather Jr must be forced to eat a meal on a menu he never ordered.
Conor Mcgregor, an Irish mixed martial artist (MMA) and famous champion in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) combat regime, has achieved a great rarity when what he began as a joke of the year to clamour for a fight with Floyd finally became fulfilled, extinguishing all slander targeted at Floyd, whom every mouth must criticise for refusing to be forced to fight at every bidder’s whim.
Floyd always suffers sharp criticism from masses wanting him to fight just because they feel so; they orally tear him to shreds the whole period they are blackmailing him to sign for a fight. Yet each time he respectfully deigns, the dreamers – the wannabes – let their crowds down because he has had to dispatch them in the usual easy format; they have all had nothing to prove in the ring as he has made them eat their own vitriol.
A double retiree, Floyd has had to be forced to return to the ring to etch his sterling record in cast iron much to the suffocating disbelief of his ill-wishers, for to them, his 49-0 must be accepted over their dead bodies, but because their bodies cannot die at the reality of his rare feat, they can at least manage to brand his personality with unprintables if not racist slurs, as has done Conor.
There is never a time soon Floyd, even at 40, shall willingly discard his hard-learnt principles of super defence, make himself a worthless target to Conor and so cheaply lose a beckoning 50-0 after a long, gruelling journey of 49 epic victories.
Conor, whose encounter with Floyd at T-Mobile Arena in Paradise, Nevada, will be his first ever professional boxing fight, and most likely the last, commands an affluence of championship glory at 24-3 in the UFC, but he must not confuse boxing for MMA. He has risked a lot by crossing a thick boundary to enter a jurisdiction where he will suffer massive regulatory restrictions.
Unsurprisingly, this affair is bound to be a real grudge scrapping as I envision a frustrated Conor running out of ideas and relapsing to UFC reflexes of holding, roughing and upending. What do I mean? Having fought only as an amateur, Conor very well knows what boxing is all about, but his DNA is predominantly MMA, and because he has sacrificed nearly all his UFC combat tools like foot-kicks, knee-kicks, forearm smacks, strangleholds, including the weightless skimpy gloves, he shall have to endure a burning episode of hands, his only legal weapon that night, weighted by full 300g gloves.
On the contrary, Floyd, the perfect human machine who rules the domain Conor has trespassed, has his usual tools fully at his disposal in no ways different to how he butchered Conor’s 49 predecessors. I am just short of prophesying Conor ending up being disqualified because he would have to almost always foul Floyd, who always angers his opponents by constantly bombing them yet completely denying them even the slightest access to him. They poured, 49 of them, upon Floyd, and 49 times Floyd administered the same verdict on them with unvaried consistency. How any fairer could he ever be?
This fight, as usual, is one where Floyd is condemned to suffer dicotyledonous humiliation either side of the score-card watershed: the South of it sees Floyd showered in untold derision and shame for losing to “an inexperienced beginner and rank-outsider”, whereas the North is that his detractors will still castigate and devalue him for mercilessly butchering “a zero-rated rival in an improper fraction”.
Conor, for all his escapades, even for only one round, shall have deserved to earn a whopping $100m.
However, as things would turn out, when all proceedings are concluded in the ring that night, as Floyd would always characteristically say of his massacred victims: “It’s another one bite the dust!” Hopefully, no-one would ever have to provoke a comfortably resting champion-extraordinaire to a fight again. Or next time, would it be a self-conceited star from taekwondo, judo, tennis or even slalom to call Floyd to a fight? Wonders shall continue!
The author is a Zambia Daily Mail employee.

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