Features

Bat invasion: What to do with the uninvited guests

BATS in Kasanka National Park

CHAMBO NG’UNI, Kabwe
MERCY Ngoma has hundreds of uninvited guests at her house – and they are a noisy lot.
Day and night, swarms of bats fly around and some hang from branches of Trichilia emetica trees high above the ground. The high-pitched sound they make is ear-piercing.
The straw-coloured fruit bats (scientific name Eidolon helvum) have taken residence in the tall trees that form a canopy on a section of Machile Street in Kabwe.
It is where Ms Ngoma’s house is located.
The mammals usually come to these trees around October, coinciding with the spectacular migration at Kasanka National Park in Chitambo district which is the biggest in the world involving millions of the flying mammal.
But for the bats in Kabwe, their presence is not welcome by the residents, who consider them a nuisance.
Some residents even fear them, associating them with witchcraft.
“These bats, as you have seen right now, are making a lot of noise and sometimes we don’t have proper sleep,” complains Mrs Ngoma, her voice drowned by the high-pitched sound of the flying mammals.
This year, the bats started arriving in the trees around October. By the end of CLICK TO READ MORE




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